Search

Accountability drive and the people

Maryam Nawaz’s arrest wasn’t a bolt from the blue, really, even though the manner in which it was carried out left a little something to be desired. The noose had been tightening, after all, for a few days now. And her refusal to appear before NAB on Thursday only made the arrest warrant a certainty. It doesn’t help her case – and the same can be said about the troubles of the Bhutto-Zardari family – but she too has been caught with her hand in the cookie jar. Yet that has not stopped the opposition, quite as expected, from making a very big issue out of it. So we have yet more accusations of selected accountability by the selected PM, which hunt, political revenge, and all that.
There can be no argument that serious and repeated financial irregularities, especially by those holding the highest offices of the land, must be answered for. And even if we disregard the popular opposition charge of revenge, despite mounting revelations, the rule of law can never be challenged. Yet there is, quite clearly, a revealing pattern in the government’s accountability drive. It has already been said enough times that NAB’s summons are more fond of knocking on the opposition’s doors than the government’s. And everybody knows how dirty some hands that keep the government’s fragile ruling alliance together really are.
There’s another problem. Even if Imran is right in going after corruption without a second thought, he is still making the critical mistake of uniting all his opponents. Defeating the no-confidence motion against the senate chairman is one thing, and congratulations once again to the magicians with the magic wand, but running the country and enacting legislating will ultimately require taking the opposition along without putting all of them behind bars.
This is a big problem because any logjam in parliament directly affects the common man. After all, PTI struggled those long years precisely so it could legislate in favour of the people, in addition to the accountability drive of course. What good would it do if this cycle just passed with the whole opposition in jail, no filling state coffers with repatriated wealth, only high inflation and much unemployment? If corruption must take precedence in policy making over the economy, then the sweep of justice must be carried out swiftly. If NAB has evidence enough to pick people from the streets, regardless of the political fallout, why does it keep them in custody forever without making any headway in the cases? Better answer these questions now before it becomes too late.



--!>

US, Taliban finalize troops’ pullout time frame

--!>