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America’s changing alliances (II)

The winds in the Asian region are now also changing, with Asia having its own set of regional hegemons it will not be an easy task for the US to make a strong hold in the Asian region which has its own set of territorial issues such as The South China Sea has become a cauldron of sovereignty disputes as China’s expansion into maritime territories also claimed by other countries has created deep anxieties across the region Intensifying these issues is the way that, in spite of growing areas of cooperation, Washington’s relations with a rising China are at risk of being eclipsed by extending levels of and strategic rivalry and distrust. Most prominently, the changing power configuration in East Asia which is a result of China’s developing military abilities and diplomatic and economic influence is expanding the potential for conflicts among Beijing and Washington over petulant local issues. It is likewise powering a developing local arms race that taxes U.S. assets. Similarly Political winds from the Philippines, Malaysia and Thailand are testing ASEAN unity and also raising questions about their commitment to cooperation with the United States. On top of this Russia has drawn closer to China and is determined to expand its role in the region hence making it very difficult for the US to have a great influence in the region.
Yet establishing a new Asia narrative, as sketched out by Trump’s inaugural trip to the region and in his new National Security Strategy still remains a work in progress. The administration’s emphasis on military strength is relatively clear, and will resonate with U.S. allies and partners in Asia. But the economic elements of its emerging narrative remain inadequate, and its focus on competition with China has merit but not on its own suffice. America’s engagement with Asia should be predicated on more than zero-sum competition and economic nationalism. China’s rise, North Korea’s threats, and other security challenges will prove more tractable if other states across Asia are strong and working together. To that end, the Trump administration should announce an initiative to accelerate the growth of security ties amongst the Asian states. This initiative would build on previous efforts by U.S. allies and partners to deepen relations with one another, and leverage preexisting configurations of like-minded states, including the revived U.S.-Japan-Australia-India Quadrangle. Similarly Pakistan’s relations with the US have been promisable for many years but do not have to be at the expense of any country, particularly China with whom we have profound strategic and economic ties. All things considered, China itself has opened up to the remainder of the world notwithstanding the restrictiveness of its political framework and unique strategic interests. China’s biggest exchanging partner is the US in spite of their various frameworks and clashing strategic objectives but close ties with India are and will become a problem for the US as Pakistan an important strategic Ally for the US will find new allies for it’s defense and will consequently have no option but to join the Russian-China block.
The writer is a MS graduate from National University of sciences and technology(NUST)
yjavairia@gmail.com
Concluded



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