Search

Riyadh agreement and Yemen conflict

The fact that two warring factions in Yemen have inked a peace agreement is not going to end the five-year old conflict. The agreement between Yemen’s Hadi government and the United Arab Emirates-backed separatists does not engage the main players – the Houthi Shia – which implies that the two reunited factions will surely unleash yet more fury on the Houthis. On the other hand, Prime Minister Imran Khan has welcomed the agreement, signed under the nose of Saudi Arabia and also the United Arab of Emirates (UAE). For this reason, the agreement is being called the Riyadh Agreement. “We believe it is a crucial and important step forward towards a political solution and durable peace and security in Yemen,” Prime Minister Khan tweeted. As per Pakistan foreign policy, Yemen conflict should be resolved amicably while Pakistan recognises the government led by President Abed Rabbo Mansour Hadi.
Until October, Sadui-backed Hadi and UAE-backed Southern Transitional Council (STC) were partners in their fight against Iran-backed Houthis. The STC staged rebellion against their masters and captured the presidential palace in Aden and the main port. What suddenly created a wedge between the partners when the STC announced the separation of south Yemen, back to 1990-unification stage? Also, the UAE has expressed frustration with the endless war on several occasions. The STC wanted the Hadi government to stop backing several Sunni Islamic parties, including the Islah, as allies, as Islah is stated to be an offshoot of the Brotherhood. The crack in the Saudi-led coalition would have given an edge to the Houthis. Realising the strategic defeat, Riyadh sprang into action and brought the Hadi government and the STC back into the coalition’s fold. Under the new power-sharing deal, Hadi’s forces would now return to Aden and the separatists would get positions in the new cabinet. The accord would strengthen their fight against the Houthi alliance and, by all means, the conflict will go on. The Houthis, however, have shown no sign of weaknesses or retreat despite Saudi-led coalition’s formidable firepower. Yemen’s port city of Sana’a, the pre-conflict capital of the country, and most of the northern parts are under Houthi control. On the other hand, Saudi-backed president Saleh is living in Riyadh, which clearly shows weakness.
The best course to end the war is to engage the Houthis in dialogue and sign a ceasefire deal. At a later stage, talks should involve all warring factions for a durable peace deal.



--!>

Sindh faces Rs109bn shortfall in federal revenue transfers four month: Murad

--!>